Sunday, June 10, 2018

Rabarberpaj (Rhubarb Crumble) #EattheWorld

Tender, tart morsels of rhubarb, sweetened with sugar and seasoned with ginger is topped with a hazelnut crumble for a taste of Sweden as we #EattheWorld.


Rubarberpaj technically translates to rhubarb pie but is actually more of a crumble baked in a pie plate.



This month our Eat the World group is visiting Sweden. This fun group, where we virtually travel around the World, enjoying traditional foods is hosted by Evelyne of CulturEatz.

Thus far we have visited Kenya, Thailand, Ireland, and Cuba.  This is the first dessert I have made as we travel and it is a keeper.  Especially, if like me, you have an overabundance of rhubarb growing in your garden.  Well, in my case it is not my garden but my friends, John and Kirsten's garden.


You want to cut the rhubarb into small slices so that it cooks completely during the baking process.


Toss it with a good amount of sugar, a little cornstarch to thicken it up and some ginger.  I used ginger paste that you find in the produce section of your grocer.  It makes life much easier if you use a lot of ginger.


A food processor makes quick work of the crumble with which to top the rhubarb.  I am lucky enough to have an oven on my outdoor grill so I baked this outside on a hot, sticky day.  It only takes moments to throw together.



I served it up warm with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. I don't know if that is traditional but it sure was delicious.  You will find links to the other Swedish creations at the bottom of this post.  I can't wait to see what the other's made.

#eattheworld, #fruitdesserts, #desserts, #crumble, #rhubarb, #Swedish,
Dessert
Swedish
Yield: 8 servingsPin it

Rubarberpaj (Rhubarb Crumble)

Tender, tart morsels of rhubarb, sweetened with sugar and seasoned with ginger is topped with a delightful hazelnut crumble.
prep time: 10 minscook time: 25 minstotal time: 35 mins

ingredients:

1 lb. rhubarb cut into 1/2" slices
3/4 c. sugar
2 T. cornstarch
1 T. ginger paste
3/4 c. flour
3/4 c. old fashioned oats
1 T. sugar
1/4 c. hazelnuts
6 T.  cold butter, divided

instructions

Toss the rhubarb with the sugar, cornstarch and ginger.  Pour it into a 9" pie plate that has been treated with baking spray.

Place the flour, oats, sugar, hazel nuts and butter in a food processor.  Pulse until hazelnuts are chopped.  

Spread the crumble over the rhubarb and bake in a hot (450*) oven for 20-25 minutes, until crumble is golden brown and rhubarb is tender.

NOTES:

This recipe adapted from SwedishFood.com
Created using The Recipes Generator





Check out all the wonderful Swedish dishes prepared by fellow Eat the World members and share with #eattheworld. Click here to find out how to join and have fun exploring a country a month in the kitchen with us! 

16 comments:

  1. That looks delicious. I love rhubarb but have never thought to pair it with ginger.

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  2. Hi Wendy, Nicoletta and I love crumbles, actually if you say Rhubarb to Nicoletta she gets this grin and I can see her wheels turning knowing we will be feasting on something delicious with rhubarb. I love that you served it with vanilla ice cream love how it just melts into that crisp topping and rhubard.
    Cheers!

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  3. I don't think I've ever actually tried rhubarb. This seems like a good recipe to start with.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, just keep in mind that it is a tart fruit. Many people are put off because they are expecting sweet.

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  4. This looks amazing Wendy! Rhubarb Crumble was on my short list for this challenge! I'm so glad you made it!

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    Replies
    1. It was very good. I loved all the recipes chosen this month.

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  5. Yum! Such a great use of rhubarb! I love the addition of ginger.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, it really paired well together.

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  6. I love rhubarb, this the season, so will be making this Wendy!

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  7. I think our rhubarb season is already over, sadly. But I will definitely try the crumble with ginger next year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our rhubarb grows here for as long as you keep cutting it down.

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  8. I'm not a fan of rhubard. But my sister grows it and makes pies!

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    Replies
    1. It is a tart fruit so many choose to pair it with a sweet fruit to compensate.

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